In Praise of Unbored

A few years ago, it was hard to go into the children’s section of a bookstore without seeing huge dumps of The Dangerous Book for Boys and its belated companion, -- -- for Girls. With its appealing Victorian-ish cover and its incitement to old-fashioned fun, I could see why it kept selling and selling, but I was so disgusted and bored by the gendering of fun that I couldn’t bear to do much more than flip through it. It was too stupid to be worth my time.

Imagine my delight, then, when I discovered Unbored at Posman Books. I snapped up a copy for my nephew, and another for my daughter. Co-written by Joshua Glenn and Elizabeth Foy Larsen, Unbored is a 21st century version of How to do Nothing with Nobody All Alone by Yourself or the Brown Paper School Books (such as The I Hate Mathematics Book or I am Not a Short Adult) (all wonderful books that my dad & I were raised on, that we own now & all worth hunting down): a book full of information and experiments that kids, from eight to thirteen or so, can do on their own.

Unbored has sections on you, society, adventure, and music. The website is full of tempting naughtiness. Want to make a seed grenade? A really gross fake wound? Unbored’s got you covered.

And I should know. It’s Martin Luther King, Jr. Day, and once again I’m breaking my vow to spend it with my kids in service. Bound to my deadline for Mrs. Dalloway, my daughters, 7 & 11, have been pretty free-range this weekend.

What did they do? They went through Unbored and found all the activities that, together, would help them make a circus: a magic trick (supplemented by several more from the web), a cool, acrobatic yoga partner pose, a banner. They will tell you it was a boring weekend, but I saw things a little differently: two little girls, consulting a book, getting more supplies (“Mom, do we have tinsel? What about a coin?”), giggling, and going back down to the basement to play some more.

Childhood at its very best. And allowing me to do the grown-up things I need to do to finish my work, and make my deadline.

This is a great book and I feel like we need to shout that from the rooftops: when someone gets something right about helping kids explore the world, learn and have fun, without putting them into boxes based on identity, let’s celebrate.

It wasn’t reviewed in the Times (though it’s been widely reviewed elsewhere), but this feature from the Home section gives you a sense of its vibe.